Anger Management
"" Home Anger Management Anger Self Test Press and News Coverage About Marty Recources Contact ""

Marci H: Anger Management Paved the Road to Sobriety

marci still 1 -thumb-350x196-26213On July 21, 2009 MBRC Counselor Ellery Holesapple waited for Marci outside the Alaska Air baggage claim at LAX. And waited. And waited.

Finally he called to report Marci must have missed the plane. No, we said, her husband had just heard from her.

“She walked right past me waiting for her with a sign that had her name printed on it,” recalls Ellery four and a half years later. “When I reached her by phone she stated she tried to score crack from the guy on the island (where people wait for shuttles) at LAX. It took another 15-20 minutes talking with her on the phone before she would tell me where she was.
Click here to read more »

Share

Good Anger

by Marty Brenner

emoticonsHumans possess a wide variety of emotions, some positive and others negative. Love, affection, safety and respect are positive emotions that make you feel good inside. Negative emotions, such as loneliness, fear and anger feel unpleasant. We are sometimes taught as very young children to express only positive emotions and suppress negative ones rather than dealing with the issues that triggered these responses. Despite cultural taboos against expressing negative emotions, anger does play a positive role in your life – there is such a thing as “good anger.”

Anger is the emotion you feel towards something that is offensive, dangerous or annoying. You need this emotion to protect yourself against a cruel and dangerous world and to set boundaries with others. An angry outburst is a clear signal that someone has offended you and a sign that you are willing to fight back. People are less likely to continue a behavior if they know the activity will elicit an angry response.
Click here to read more »

Share

Intolerance

by Marty Brenner

Intolerance-Button-(0998)
Anger is a natural reaction to pain. You use anger to establish boundaries between yourself and the person causing you pain. You make it very clear that, if he crosses the boundary, you will react with anger. Anger says you will not tolerate a specific behavior, communication or idea. You are intolerant of anything outside your personal boundaries, your comfort zone. Whenever you encounter anything you find intolerant, you react with anger without thinking. Click here to read more »

Share

Anger and Relationships General Overview and Differences

by Marty Brenner

arguingYou build relationships with others when you trust others with your thoughts and feelings. In a healthy relationship, you communicate your ideas and emotions with people that you know will respond in a positive way. A relationship is an emotional compromise, where participants agree to certain terms of behavioral limits. When one person breaks the agreement by making a mistake or doing a bad thing, the other party might respond by initiating an angry dialog between the two. This breakdown in communication can ruin the relationship as each party behaves in an increasingly aggressive fashion. Left unaddressed, anger dissolves the foundation of the relationship.
Click here to read more »

Share

Don’t Let Anxiety and Fear Keep You From Getting Help Dealing With Anger Addiction

By Marty Brenner, C.C.D.C. #104227

anxThere’s probably no person living who has not at some time or another, experienced severe negative emotions. When these feelings of anger happen again and again, however, and seem to be beyond the individual’s control, they are in fact an addiction. And, when this addiction moves to rage, it is an condition that must be addressed, for the good health of the individual and everyone around him.

Anger is not always negative; it can be channeled into positive achievements. If a particular social condition arouses negative emotions in you, this can motivate you to take the steps necessary to do something about it. Rage, on the other hand, is purely negative, and has absolute no positive aspects. When it becomes a dependency, recurring again and again, it can be destructive to relationships and to personal well-being. Click here to read more »

Share
talk to marty